The Anchor
 
In times like these, we need a Savior
In times like these, we need an anchor
Be very sure, be very sure
Your anchor holds, and grips the Solid Rock

The rock is Jesus, yes He’s the One
This rock is Jesus, the only One
Be very sure, be very sure
Your anchor holds, and grips the Solid Rock

(“In Times Like These” by Ruth Caye Jones)
 
 
 
 
One of the most fascinating men who ever lived was a sea captain named James Cook.  I have always been interested in reading about him, because I have traveled to many of the places where he explored the world of the late 1700s in a creaky sailing vessel, Resolution, with a sister-ship named Discovery. 
 
Where I live here in Alaska is on a bluff across the bay of Cook Inlet, which goes into Prince William Sound, named by Cook for the English king's third son. Our largest city, Anchorage, lies at its entrance.  Captain Cook's two ships anchored here for repairs after a near-disastrous leak had sprung in the Resolution, but on his charts it was called "Cape Hold-with-Hope".   They had left England to find the elusive passage from the Pacific to the Atlantic, but the passage was never found, and afterwards they would head out into the Alaska peninsula, which in turn fractures into the Aleutian chain.
 
Finding a suitable anchorage always concerned sailors.  Along the coast of Cape Horn in 1578 Sir Francis Drake's chaplain wrote:
"The winds were such as if the bowels of the earth had set all at liberty, or as if all the clouds under heaven had been called together to lay their force upon that one place.  The seas...were rolled up from the depths, even from the base of the rocks, as if they had been a scroll of parchment...The impossibility of anchoring or spreading any sail, the most made seas, the lee shores, the dangerous rocks, the contrary and most intolerable winds...all offered us such small likelihood of escaping destruction, that if the special providence of God himself had not supported us, we could never have endured this woeful state..."
 
Ruth Jones' "In Times Like These" speaks of such situations where all that can be done by man's efforts is exhausted and were it not for the LORD, we could not make it through our trials to lower our anchor into the safe "Cape Hold-with-Hope". 
 
Surely, all of us are familiar with such moments where terror could overwhelm our minds when all about us we see the waves roaring and rising above our heads. Cook had once been shocked to discover worms had eaten away at his ship, and another time coral ripped the hull and ice coated the rigging as they navigated through the icebergs of Antarctica.  It was never easy, nor was it ever certain they would return back to England safely. 
 
Will God be there for us in such perils?  The Apostle Paul told of God's angel, "who stood by me" when he was shipwrecked and "in the deep" for three days and nights.  Peter knew such times when Jesus had beckoned him to come walk on the water.  He had made it look so easy...yet fear began to attach itself to Peter's senses at the sight of the waves, and he began to sink.  But at his cry, Jesus' hand took his and became an anchor to a solid rock. 
 
Right at this moment it is 6 am, and as I lay here in my bed with this laptop computer writing, I too am anchored in that certain "Cape Hold-with-Hope." for repairs of a different kind, for on inspection I have learned that my vessel has cancerous cells eating away at my hull.  All around me Satan flashes pictures of destruction.  They look ominous.  Yet I know what I must do---what I have done many times before:
 
Stay aboard the Resolution and anchor in Cape Hold-with-Hope! 
 
~~~~~
 
Dear friend, if you are fighting to get into that safe anchorage--remember who it is that calms the seas.   He may be asleep in the back of your boat somewhere, seemingly obvilious to your concerns.  But  remember this--no Good Captain ever grumbles or is angry when you wake Him up. 
 
After all, it's His ship....
 
 
MARY E. ADAMS